Outdoor Activities

Chatelherault Park

Chatelherault Country Park is a Five Star Visitor Attraction that was once described as a 'Jewel in the Landscape'. Built in 1732 as a Hunting Lodge and Summer House for the Dukes of Hamilton.

The restored buildings now house a Visitor Centre; the West Lodge comprising of the Banqueting Hall and Duke and Duchess Apartments; Exhibition Gallery and Displays; Gift Shop and Café. Outside, visitors can explore 10 miles of walks along the scenic River Avon and through ancient woodland.

Amazonia

Scotland’s largest indoor rainforest attraction offering a fun and educational experience for all ages.  An insight into life in a tropical forest where visitors are also given the opportunity to take part in daily animal handling. (Motherwell)

Falls of Clyde

This reserve is famous for its spectacular waterfalls and scenic woodland walks. Over 100 bird species have been recorded including peregrines and kingfishers. Daubenton's bats can be spotted in the evenings. Badgers forage amongst the undergrowth and otters are often seen along the riverbank.

The reserve has a network of paths, including the top section of the Clyde Walkway.

The Falls of Clyde is part of the Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership and the Clyde Valley Woodlands National Nature Reserve.

GLASGOW BOTANICAL GARDENS

Glasgow Botanic Gardens are located in the West End of Glasgow. It features several glasshouses, the most notable of which is the Kibble Palace. The gardens were created in 1817, and run by the Royal Botanic Institution of Glasgow, and were intended to supply the University of Glasgow.

William Hooker was Regius Professor of Botany at Glasgow University, and contributed to the development of the Botanic Gardens before his appointment to the directorship of Kew Gardens in London.

The gardens were originally used for concerts and other events, and in 1891 the gardens were incorporated into the Parks and Gardens of the City of Glasgow.

Strathclyde Country Park

Strathclyde Park covers some 1000 acres, centred on the artificial Strathclyde Loch. It is located next to the River Clyde between Hamilton and Motherwell. Strathclyde Park forms what used to be known as the Low parks of the now demolished Hamilton Palace and still includes buildings associated with the palace.

The park offers many amenities and attractions such as coarse angling, woodland walks, watersports, and a camping and caravanning site. One of Scotland's theme parks, M&D's, is located in the park.

The remains of Bothwellhaugh Roman Fort and a Roman bath house can be seen in the park, where the South Calder Water flows into the loch. There is an arched Roman bridge across the South Calder nearby. The site of the Battle of Bothwell Bridge (1679) is to the north west of the park.

There is an arched Roman bridge across the South Calder nearby. The site of the Battle of Bothwell Bridge (1679) is to the north west of the park.

Although the focus of the park is on recreation, a variety of habitats are present, including wetlands and native woodland.